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Digital Policy Salon: Our Internet Anxieties - Governance, Privacy, and Mental Health

Welcome to the seventh issue of the Digital Policy Salon briefing. How much time have we all spent o
Digital Policy Salon
Digital Policy Salon: Our Internet Anxieties - Governance, Privacy, and Mental Health
By ICTC-CTIC • Issue #7 • View online
Welcome to the seventh issue of the Digital Policy Salon briefing.
How much time have we all spent online this week? It would be quite daunting to calculate, but depending on who you are and what you think of the internet’s impacts, that question might provoke anxiety, a feeling of greater connection, or both.
This week we explore many facets of connective technologies: in our perspective piece, we write about data privacy and the role of gatekeepers who require personal information in exchange for essential services. At the same time, our weekly interview examines an elusive and complex topic: how, why, and by whom is the internet governed? In ‘what we’re reading,’ we look at a timely piece that touches upon technology’s intersection with parenting and important outcomes for children, a subject that’s highly related to this week’s special event on technology in the classroom. Finally, our featured research highlights essential infrastructure needs for Canada’s smart economy, including a look at our country’s digital divide.
Whether you’re part of business, government, or the general public, the concept of a 'Smart City’ is increasingly present in all of our lives. To help shape future investments in Canada’s smart, urban spaces, please take a moment to complete one of the following smart city surveys: Smart Cities Business Survey / Smart Cities Government Survey
- Tyler & Faun

COVID-19 Policy Updates 🇨🇦
Additional support for students and small- to medium-sized businesses
Several new funding programs for small- to medium-sized businesses were announced by the federal government in the past week, including:
In addition to new funding for small- to medium-sized businesses, the government announced new support programs for students:
Alongside the new 75% wage subsidy and the expanded summer jobs program, the CESB and CSSG will create new opportunities for students unable to find work this summer as a result of COVID-19. The measures combined are expected to create up to 116,000 jobs, placements, and other training opportunities.
Provinces, territories, and First Nations to lead the charge on reopening the economy
When it comes to relaxing containment measures and reopening the economy, local governments will be making their own independent decisions. The impact of COVID-19 has varied significantly across Canada, generating a unique set of challenges in each of the provinces and territories and in Indigenous communities.
The federal government will nonetheless facilitate inter-regional discussions to ensure a common approach is maintained across Canada during this process.
Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam highlights lower hospitalization rates, greater ICU capacity, and approved serological testing as necessary perquisites for reopening the economy. Serological tests, which test for antibodies as opposed to the virus itself, are according to Tam vital to determining the level of immunity of various communities throughout Canada. No such devices have been approved by Health Canada yet, however several related studies are underway. - Mairead Matthews | email
Our Perspective
Striking a balance between privacy and service delivery
Special Events
Join Us For a Virtual Panel
Interviews in the Field
Why, How, and By Whom is the Internet Governed?
Corinne Cath-Speth, PhD candidate at the Oxford Internet Institute
Corinne Cath-Speth, PhD candidate at the Oxford Internet Institute
What We're Reading
Parenting Kids With Anxiety
Pandemic will drive biggest drop in CO2 emissions since WW II, World Meteorological Organization says
Research Visualized
Health information management professionals tend to have relatively high wages in relation to their AI (artificial intelligence) Augmentation Score (about 6% higher than the average Canadian wage in 2018). Health information management occupations perform tasks like classifying diseases, maintaining health records, and preparing medical statistics.
Health Information Management Occupations vs General Economy - Source: ICTC, 2019
Health Information Management Occupations vs General Economy - Source: ICTC, 2019
The graph above shows the normalized Canadian employment trend for Health Information Management Occupations vs. the General Economy. The occupation began rapidly declining in employment even before the 2008 recession. Since 2005, wages have increased while employment has declined. This inverse correlation indicates a shift in the underlying characteristics of the occupation from low-skill components (which have been replaced by AI) towards higher-skill components that AI cannot perform.
Our Research
Essential Infrastructure for the Smart Economy
Twitter Highlights
NRC Canada
Canadian #SME! Our #IRAP Innovation Assistance Program website is LIVE! For more information on who can apply:
https://t.co/hmWhLtZuhh https://t.co/EpXpmQzGim
7:50 AM - 22 Apr 2020
Talk to Us 💬
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Please take a moment to complete one of the following smart city surveys: Smart Cities Business Survey / Smart Cities Government Survey
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