View profile

Digital Policy Salon: The Black Box Problem (and beyond)

Welcome to the 22nd issue of the Digital Policy Salon weekly briefing. What is the difference between
Digital Policy Salon
Digital Policy Salon: The Black Box Problem (and beyond)
By ICTC-CTIC • Issue #22 • View online
Welcome to the 22nd issue of the Digital Policy Salon weekly briefing.
What is the difference between AI R&D and successful AI application? This week, we dive into the complex world of effective, ethical, and practical applications of artificial intelligence, with featured research on AI in the forestry sector and its vulnerability to aggressive patenting, as well as two “what we’re reading” pieces on AI applications in medicine and predicting individual life outcomes. One of the organizations at the forefront of industry coalitions on ethical AI, Silicon Valley’s Partnership on AI, is featured in this issue’s Tech & Human Rights series interview.
In addition, our weekly perspective piece provides an overview of a timely and in-demand workforce: experienced cybersecurity professionals remain difficult to find in Canada, but workforce development solutions are waiting in the wings. Finally, our policy update highlights a high-priority topic for many Canadians: how is each province handling “back to school” plans this fall?
Thanks for joining us, and we encourage you to leave us feedback on what you’d like to see more of in the Digital Policy Salon at the bottom of this issue.
- Faun, Khiran, and Tyler

COVID-19 Policy Updates 🇨🇦
Just weeks away from the 2020-2021 school year, what do post-COVID-19 education plans look like in Canada’s four biggest provinces?
While all provinces have adopted new health safety rules focused on class size, social distancing, and PPE, plans for online and in-person course delivery vary significantly across jurisdictions.
Ontario
Ontario schools will be moving forward with a hybrid approach. Conventional, in-person classes will be offered to students kindergarten to grade 8, however parents may choose to opt out of in-person delivery to pursue online learning instead. For secondary students, at least 50% of courses will be delivered through in-person instruction, supplemented by up to 50% online courses.
Parents have expressed concern about the quality of online learning and the potential for additional labour for parents who choose that route. A recent survey of the Ottawa district school board showed that approximately 24% of Ottawa students have opted to learn online.
Québec
In Québec, students from Preschool to Secondary III will be required to return to school for in-person learning; while students Secondary IV to V will attend at-least 50% of their courses in-person, with complementary online learning taking place at home.
British Columbia
Much like other years, students registered in “brick and mortar” schools across British Columbia will be expected to attend their classes in person. Elementary and middle school students will only be provided daily online learning options if they are specifically registered in an online or distributed learning school, and secondary students will only learn online when its needed to accommodate new class sizes.
The province has also announced an additional $3 million in education funding to acquire new remote learning tools and other tech.
Alberta
With perhaps the least number of changes to its regular school programming, Alberta will move forward with a “near normal” school year. All students aged Kindergarten to grade 12 will attend in-person classes while following new COVID-19 health measures.
- Mairead Matthews | email
Our Perspective
Searching for Hidden Talent | Overview
Interviews in the Field
The Partnership on AI: A Multi-Stakeholder Coalition for Responsible Technology
 Katya Klinova, Lead of AI, Labour, and Economy research programs at the Partnership on AI
Katya Klinova, Lead of AI, Labour, and Economy research programs at the Partnership on AI
What We're Reading
Facebook's AI can generate MRI images in minutes instead of an hour
Prediction, Machine Learning, and Individual Lives: an Interview with Matthew Salganik
Research Visualized
Provinces' and Territories' proportion of the Canadian population compared with their proportion of posted cybersecurity roles. Job Posting data is from January 2020 - Source: ICTC, Statistics Canada
Provinces' and Territories' proportion of the Canadian population compared with their proportion of posted cybersecurity roles. Job Posting data is from January 2020 - Source: ICTC, Statistics Canada
As part of our report Searching for Hidden Talent: Experience and Expertise in New Brunswick’s Cybersecurity Community, we looked at cybersecurity job posting data by province. This graphic compares the percentage share of jobs posted in cybersecurity versus the percentage share of Canada’s population, by province. The biggest takeaway, of course, is the size of Ontario’s cybersecurity job market. It shouldn’t be missed, however, that the per-capita numbers in Atlantic Canada are also ahead of those in the rest of the country.
Our Research
Artificial Intelligence and the Forestry Sector
Twitter Highlights
Jason Ribeiro
If anyone ever asks you what a new economy can look like for Calgary, show them this...
#YYC #yyctech #NewEconomy #LiveTechLoveLife https://t.co/wQNgu1JLta
Talk to Us 💬
Send your comments, questions, and tech policy insights to:

Subscribe to ICTC’s flagship newsletter here.
Did you enjoy this issue?
ICTC-CTIC

Digital Policy Salon is a weekly email briefing that provides an in-depth look at the digital economy and the policies that shape it.

If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue